Category: air sealing

Breathe Easier: Air Seal Your Home!

Florida residents enjoy warm temps for most of the year. Who doesn’t love that? Allergy sufferers!

Did you know that by sealing your home’s air leaks, you can reduce indoor air pollutants?

Most homes are not properly air sealed and have penetration points around the exterior. These penetration points are commonly found around recessed lighting, windows, vents and anywhere else where there is a hole in the home’s exterior. Damp, pollen-filled air can infiltrate your home through these penetration points and have a negative impact on indoor air quality.

Sealing air leaks helps keep outside air (and outside pollutants) out of your home. In addition to reduced allergens and better indoor air quality, sealing air leaks helps maintain your home’s indoor temperature and can reduce your energy bills!

Interested in air sealing? Contact or call us today for a free estimate!

How Spray Foam Helps Increase the Benefits of Air Sealing

The process of air sealing reduces the amount of air that transfers through your home. Air sealing is an important energy saving step that helps control energy costs, reduces drafts, helps keep out pests and allergens, and increases the overall air quality in your home.

Air can leak through cracks and openings around a building envelope. Air leaks allow conditioned inside air to escape your home and unconditioned air to enter. For many years air leaks were believed to allow adequate and proper home ventilation. Building science has proved uncontrolled air leaks can cause too much or too little air to enter or leave your home, resulting in poor indoor air quality.

Spray foam insulation is a one-step solution to insulate and seal air leaks. Spray foam insulation is applied as a liquid and expands to completely fill a cavity. When it expands, it naturally seals air leaks while adding R-value. Spray foam insulation can also increase building strength which can be beneficial during strong winds.

Interested in learning more about spray foam and getting an estimate for your next project? Contact us today and learn more.

Why Home Ventilation Matters

Today’s homes are built using a variety of green building techniques. These methods create tighter, more efficient homes that can save homeowners money on energy bills. Tight building envelopes also keep air impurities inside the home including any chemicals used in cleaning products, paint, building materials and more. This combination makes a strong case for a proper home ventilation system to maintain your home’s air quality and energy efficiency.

Many factors influence the appropriate type of ventilation for a home including local code requirements, building size and types of appliances. Here are three of the most common ventilation systems:

  • Exhaust Only – Exhaust-only systems use an exhaust fan, typically placed in a kitchen or bathroom, to remove stale inside air and moisture. They often run on a timer so they can work throughout the day. This type of system relies on the home’s natural air leaks to allow outside air to enter. Exhaust-only systems do not properly manage the influx of outside air.
  • Supply Only – A supply-only system includes a fan that brings fresh air into the home and uses the home’s natural air leaks to allow inside air to escape. A filter can be added to the intake to trap pollen and other air pollutants before they enter the home. A dehumidifier can be added inside the home to control humidity levels. Supply-only systems bring in outside air but do not effectively manage removal of inside air.
  • Balanced – A balanced system includes both exhaust and supply, controlling ventilation at both ends. This system includes separate fans to manage air supply and air exhaust. Overall, this is a better ventilation system because it provides qualities of both exhaust-only and supply-only systems. However, it may be more costly to run.

Does your home have a ventilation system? Do you have questions about your home’s air sealing and ventilation? Contact us with any questions.

Attic Insulation: Good, Better and Best

Blown-in insulation being installed in an atticWhen it comes home insulation, the first area that usually comes to mind is the attic. Airflow in buildings moves from ground to sky, naturally pulling conditioned indoor air up and out of the structure. By keeping conditioned air inside your home you can also reduce wear and tear on your heating system and help keep energy bills in line.

There are three common methods used to insulate attics – blown-in fiberglass, blown-in fiberglass with air sealing, and spray foam insulation. Here’s what you need to know about each:

Blown-in Fiberglass

Insulating attics with blown-in fiberglass insulation is a quick and easy way to add R-value. This is a basic method of attic insulation and a cost-effective option to upgrade attics in existing homes or insulate attics in new homes.

Blown-in Fiberglass with Air Sealing

Combining blown-in fiberglass insulation with air sealing dramatically increases a home’s energy efficiency. This method helps keep conditioned air inside the home and adds R-value. In an existing home, attic insulation is removed and penetration points around the attic floor are sealed. After air sealing is complete, a fresh blanket of blown-in fiberglass insulation is installed. In a new home, penetration points around the attic floor are sealed before blown-in insulation is installed.

Spray Foam Insulation

Installing spray foam insulation in the attic of a new or existing home provides optimal energy protection. In an existing home, insulation is removed from the attic and spray foam is installed along the roofline. In a new home, spray foam insulation is installed along the roofline as part of the construction process.

Proper attic insulation combined with air sealing is one of the most cost-effective ways to save money on energy bills.

Wondering if your home could benefit from additional attic insulation? Ready to discuss insulation for your new home project? Contact our office today! 

Three New Home Features that Save Money and Energy

If you’re building a new home, it’s the perfect time to integrate energy saving products and features. Taking time to select the right building materials and products now will pay off with increased indoor comfort and lower energy bills on day one. Here are three areas of your new home where smart energy investments will pay off:
  1. Insulation
    Properly insulating your home’s exterior can keep energy bills low. Consider upgrading your attic insulation, wall insulation and crawl space insulation during the construction process. Adding a professionally installed blanket of insulation around your home’s exterior will help keep energy dollars in and exterior noise out.
  2. Air Sealing
    Air sealing complements insulation by sealing penetration points to stop conditioned air from escaping your home. Some penetration points are visible to the eye while others are more difficult to identify. Tip: Choose spray foam insulation for your new home to add R-value and fully seal air leaks in one step.
  3. Doors and Windows
    Choose proper exterior doors and windows. Different sides of your home can be impacted by various weather factors including wind and sun. Consider the energy rating for windows and doors and the side of the home on which they will be installed. Be sure your insulation contractor fully air seals around all doors and windows.

Do you have questions about insulation and air sealing for your new home? Could your existing home benefit from air sealing and upgraded insulation? Contact our office – we can help!

Four Problems Caused By a Crawl Space

If a home is built on a crawl space, it can mean trouble. Because a crawl space is in direct contact with the ground, the impact it can have on a home and residents is significant. Here are four problems that can be caused by a crawl space and how spray foam insulation can help:

  1. MOISTURE DAMAGE
    Moisture is the number one enemy of a crawl space. Moisture damage from drainage and its direct contact with the earth can go unnoticed and lead to a host of other problems! Air sealing and insulating your crawl space as well as ensuring proper drainage around your home can help eliminate moisture and any associated problems.
  2. POOR AIR QUALITY
    The air quality within a crawl space has a direct impact on the air quality inside your home. As your home naturally breathes, moist air flows up from the earth. The damp air in a crawl space gets pulled into living areas of a home through unsealed areas between the crawl space and the first floor of your home (such as air ducts, wiring holes, plumbing penetrations, etc). Any air quality issues in a crawl space are guaranteed to impact a home’s living area.
  3. PESTS
    Damp conditions in a crawl space create ideal living conditions for pests, combined with any warmth from heating ducts and the wood joists that serve as a food source. Using spray foam insulation to insulate and air seal a crawl space eliminates access points for pests and the moisture that attracted them in the first place.
  4. LOST ENERGY DOLLARS
    If the integrity of a home’s structure and indoor air quality isn’t enough to convince a homeowner to insulate and air seal a crawl space, consider the impact on energy bills. An unsealed crawl space can lead to uncomfortable temperatures on the first floor of a home, uneven temperature between rooms and elevated heating and cooling bills.

Your crawl space is a huge opportunity to save energy, save money and improve a home’s indoor air quality. Upgrading your crawl space is an investment in your home and your family’s health. What are you waiting for? Contact us to schedule your free estimate!

Save Money with These Fiberglass Insulation Applications

Fiberglass insulation has been around for decades. It was one of the first widely used insulators installed in homes and businesses long before the industry had an understanding of building science. In many ways, it can be described as the “grandfather” of insulation. With its longevity and many newer insulation products on the market, fiberglass insulation could be seen as obsolete.

Fiberglass insulation is still a great option to insulate any area of a home. When combined with today’s newer technologies, fiberglass insulation offers high performance at a fraction of the cost of other insulation products.

  • Fiberglass with Air Sealing. The woven fibers in this type of insulation do not inherently stop airflow. While fiberglass insulation adds R-value it does not keep conditioned air from escaping through penetration points. Combining fiberglass insulation with air sealing prevents conditioned air from escaping the home, helping reduce energy bills and wear and tear on your heating and cooling system.
  • Dense Pack Wall Insulation. Fiberglass batts have traditionally been installed in wall cavities of new homes or remodeled spaces. Dense packing loose fill fiberglass insulation into wall cavities can provide a more thorough insulating layer than fiberglass batts by completely filling a cavity to each stud. This can be taken a step further by air sealing the wall cavity before installing insulation to further increase energy efficiency.

Fiberglass insulation provides many cost-effective insulation options for today’s builder and homeowner. Contact our office to learn more about these options and schedule a free estimate.